US authorities select Climeworks for major carbon capture project

14 August 2023 11:12

Zurich CCGreater ZurichSwiss AMCHAM SoCal

Zurich/Washington D.C. - The US Department of Energy has selected Climeworks for a project aiming to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. Together with other partners, the ETH Zurich spin-off will strive to play its part in the removal of one million metric tons of CO2 from the atmosphere each year.

The Zurich-based technology company Climeworks is taking part in a carbon capture initiative that seeks to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. As part of Project Cypress, the spin-off from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH) will, in conjunction with other project partners, strive to capture more than one million metric tons of existing CO2 from the atmosphere each year and store it permanently deep underground, further details of which can be found in a press release issued by the US Department of Energy in Washington D.C.

The press release states that Project Cypress is based in Calcasieu Parish in the southwest of the US State of Louisiana. In its role as the principal contractor, the research institute Battelle, headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, is responsible for this site and the direct air capture hub program situated there. Heirloom from San Francisco is another partner involved in this project.

The project intends to use the local carbon storage company Gulf Coast Sequestration (GCS) to bind the captured CO2. According to the information, GCS is at an advanced stage of the process to be awarded drilling permits by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Project Cypress is part of a broad offensive pursued by the US Department of Energy in the area of Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) through Direct Air Capture (DAC). Another DAC hub will be established in Kleberg County in the south of Texas.

Overall, the US government is set to invest a sum of 1.2 billion US dollars in a nationwide network of large-scale carbon capture facilities, with the aim of addressing “legacy carbon dioxide pollution” and boosting rapid reductions in CO2 emissions. ce/ko

Swiss Pavilion Digital

Previous newsletters